Extreme Heat

The hottest months in Alabama are from June to August with averages ranging from the low to mid 90s accompanied by high humidity and heat indexes. Extreme Heat often results in the highest number of annual deaths among all weather-related hazards. In most of the United
States, extreme heat is defined as a long period (2 to 3 days) of high heat and humidity with temperatures above 90 degrees. In extreme heat, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature. This can lead to death by overworking the human body. Remember that:

  • Extreme heat can occur quickly and without warning.
  • Humidity increases the feeling of heat as measured by a heat index.

If You Are Under An Extreme Heat Warning:

  • Find air conditioning.
  • Avoid strenuous activities.
  • Watch for heat illness.
  • Wear light clothing.
  • Check on roommates and friends.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Watch for heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke.
  • Never leave people, service animals, or pets in a closed car. 
  • Use sunscreen lotions.

How To Stay Safe When Extreme Heat Threatens:

Prepare NOW

  • Find places  where you can go to get cool.
  • Learn to recognize the signs of heat-related illness.
    • Hot, red, dry, or damp skin
    • Headaches
    • Nausea
    • Confusion
    • Losing Consciousness (passing out)

Be Safe DURING

  • Never leave anyone alone inside a vehicle on a warm day.
  • Find places with air conditioning. Libraries, shopping malls, and community centers can provide a cool place to take a break from the heat.
  • If you’re outside, find shade. Wear a hat wide enough to protect your face, and sunglasses to protect your eyes.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Drink plenty of water and minimize carbonated drinks to stay hydrated. If you or someone you care for is on a special diet, ask a doctor how best to accommodate it.
  • Avoid high-energy activities.
  • Check yourself, roommates and neighbors for signs of heat-related illness.

Recognize and Respond

Know the signs of heat-related illness and the ways to respond to it:

  • HEAT CRAMPS
    • Signs: Muscle pains or spasms in the stomach, arms, or legs
    • Actions: Go to a cooler location. Remove excess clothing. Take sips of cool sports drinks with salt and sugar. Call Campus Security or Residence Life Staff if cramps last more than an hour.
  • HEAT EXHAUSTION
    • Signs: Heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headache, nausea or vomiting, or fainting
    • Actions: Go to an air-conditioned place and lie down. Loosen or remove clothing. Take a cool bath. Take sips of cool sports drinks with salt and sugar.
    • Call Campus Security or Residence Life Staff or Student Affairs Staff.
  • HEAT STROKE
    • Signs: Extremely high body temperature (above 103 degrees) taken orally; red, hot, and dry skin with no sweat; rapid, strong pulse; dizziness; confusion; or unconsciousness
    • Actions: Call 911 or Campus Security at 833-4663. . Cool down with whatever methods are available until medical help arrives.

Snowstorms & Extreme Cold

Huntingdon College Security and Residential Life Staff issue guidance to campus constituents during times of heightened awareness, which includes temperature extremes. Should an actual extreme temperature condition exist, all campus constituencies should follow the specific direction of Campus Security and/or Residential Life

Winters are generally mild in Alabama, as they are throughout most of the southeastern United States, with average January low temperatures around 35 °F (2 °C) in Montgomery. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be prepared for cold weather and winter storms as they do occur rarely in Montgomery the worst being in January and February.

Winter storms create a higher risk of car accidents, hypothermia, frostbite, carbon monoxide poisoning, and heart attacks from overexertion. Winter storms and blizzards can bring extreme cold, freezing rain, snow, ice, and high winds. A winter storm can:

  • Last a few hours or several days;
  • Knock out heat, power, and communication services

IF YOU ARE UNDER A WINTER STORM WARNING, FIND SHELTER RIGHT AWAY

  • Stay off roads.
  • Stay indoors and dress warmly.
  • Prepare for power outages.
  • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
  • Look for signs of hypothermia and frostbite.
  • Check on roommates and friends.

How To Stay Safe When A Winter Storm Threatens:

While staying in on-campus housing:

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk for winter storms. Extreme winter weather can leave communities without utilities or other services for long periods of time.
  • Pay attention to weather reports and warnings of freezing weather and winter storms. Sign up for the Huntingdon Emergency Notification System, your local Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • . Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication.  Have extra batteries for radios and flashlights.
  • Create an emergency supply kit for your car. Include jumper cables, sand, a flashlight, warm clothes, blankets, bottled water, and non-perishable snacks. Keep the gas tank full.
  • Learn the signs of, and basic treatments for, frostbite and hypothermia.

Survive DURING

  • Stay off roads if at all possible. If trapped in your car, then stay inside. Conserve your cellular telephone battery by texting for help.
  • Limit your time outside. If you need to go outside, then wear layers of warm clothing. Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.
  • Never heat your room with a gas stovetop or oven.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia and begin treatment right away.
  • Check on roommates, friends, and neighbors within your dorm room.

While staying off campus, including off-campus College housing:

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk for winter storms. Extreme winter weather can leave communities without utilities or other services for long periods of time.
  • Pay attention to weather reports and warnings of freezing weather and winter storms. Sign up for the Huntingdon Emergency Notification System, your local Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • leave faucets slightly dripping
  • Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication.  Gather supplies in cases of power outage where you may need to stay home for an extended period of time. Have extra batteries for radios and flashlights.
  • Create an emergency supply kit for your car. Include jumper cables, sand, a flashlight, warm clothes, blankets, bottled water, and non-perishable snacks. Keep the gas tank full.
  • Learn the signs of, and basic treatments for, frostbite and hypothermia.

Survive DURING

  • Stay off roads if at all possible. If trapped in your car, then stay inside. Conserve your cellular telephone battery by texting for help.
  • Limit your time outside. If you need to go outside, then wear layers of warm clothing. Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.
  • Never heat your home with a gas stovetop or oven.
  • Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia and begin treatment right away.
  • Report any fallen power lines to Alabama Power
  • Check on roommates, friends, and neighbors.

Recognize and Respond

  • Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.
    • Signs: Numbness, white or grayish-yellow skin, firm or waxy skin
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Soak in warm, not hot, water. Use body heat to warm. Do not massage or use a heating pad.
  • Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.
    • Signs: Shivering, exhaustion, confusion, fumbling hands, memory loss, slurred speech, or drowsiness
    • Actions: Go to a warm room. Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin. Keep dry and wrapped up in warm blankets, including the head and neck.
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