Tornadoes

Tornadoes can destroy buildings, flip cars, and create deadly flying debris. Tornadoes are violently rotating columns of air that extend from a thunderstorm to the ground. Tornadoes can:

  • Happen anytime and anywhere;
  • Bring intense winds, over 200 MPH; and
  • Look like funnels.

 IF YOU ARE UNDER A TORNADO WARNING, FIND SAFE SHELTER IMMEDIATELY!!!

Huntingdon College Designated Areas to Shelter in Place
during a Tornado WARNING or other Emergency

Listed below, you will find the locations of safe places to shelter in place during a tornado or other Emergency:

Building Coordinators and Assistant Coordinators will;

  1. be located at every Tornado Safety location.
  2. be responsible for identifying safe locations for students, faculty, and staff to be located.
  3. attempt to block windows and doors if safe.
  4. assist in accountability of students, staff, and faculty.
  5. announce the “all clear” when directed to by the Command Post Team (CPT).

Current Location

Tornado safety location

Wilson BuildingFirst floor Wilson Building
Russell Dining HallDining Hall Serving line
Maintenance ShopDining Hall Serving line
Pratt HallPratt Basement
Jackson HomeJackson Basement
Searcy HallSearcy Basement
Blount HallBlount Hall first floor
Bellingrath HallBellingrath Hall Basement
Flowers HallFlowers Basement; or First floor hallway.
Smith BuildingSmith Recital Hall or First floor
Houghton LibraryLibrary Basement
HutLibrary Basement
Roland Student CenterRoland Basement
Ligon HallLigon Hall first floor hallway
Neal Posey Baseball fieldRoland Basement
Tennis CourtsRoland Basement
Soccer/Softball FieldLigon Hall First floor
Delchamps President’s homePresident’s home center most point first floor
Wilson Community Ctr./ GymWilson Basement
W. James Samford, Jr., Stadium/Football FieldWilson Community Center/Gym basement, or the Football Field House.
Coach “Buzz” Phillips Football Field HouseFootball Field House
Cloverdale BuildingCloverdale first floor hallways
Weil CenterWeil Center Hallway
Cloverdale Drum TheatreCloverdale first floor hallways
Walking on campusProceed to the closest location listed above

**In all cases, find safety against walls and away from windows.

Remember

  • If you can safely get to a sturdy building, then do so immediately.
  • Go to a safe room, basement, or storm cellar. Become familiar with the Huntingdon College main campus map and know your location.
  • If you are in a building with no basement, then get to a small interior room on the lowest level.
  • Stay away from windows, doors, and outside walls.
  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You’re safer in a low, flat location.
  • Watch out for flying debris that can cause injury or death.
  • Use your arms to protect your head and neck.

How to Stay Safe When A Tornado Threatens

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s tornado risk. In the U.S., the Midwest and the Southeast have a greater risk for tornadoes.
  • Know the signs of a tornado, including a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud; an approaching cloud of debris; or a loud roar—similar to a freight train.
  • Huntingdon College uses it’s Emergency Notification System to alert you of a severe weather event. Keep your contact information and cellular telephone number up to date with Huntingdon College’s Tech Team.
  • Sign up for Hawk Alert Emergency Notification System.The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts. The City of Montgomery has tornado sirens, become familiar with the warning tone.
  • Pay attention to weather reports. Meteorologists can predict when conditions might be indicative of a tornado.
  • Identify and practice going to a safe shelter in the event of high winds. Identify your safe shelter below for each Huntingdon College location. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room on the lowest level of a sturdy building.

Survive DURING

  • Immediately go to a safe location that you identified.
  • Take additional cover by shielding your head and neck with your arms and putting materials such as furniture and blankets around you.
  • Listen to the EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, or local alerting systems for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not try to outrun a tornado in a vehicle.
  • If you are in a car or outdoors and cannot get to a building, cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body with a coat or blanket, if possible.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Assess yourself and others around you for injuries. Provide assistance and first aid if appropriate. Dial 911 for emergency assistance and contact Campus Security immediately after.
  • Keep listening to EAS, NOAA Weather Radio, Campus Security and local authorities for updated information.
  • If you are trapped, cover your mouth with a cloth or mask to avoid breathing dust. Try to send a text, bang on a pipe or wall, or use a whistle instead of shouting.
  • Stay clear of fallen power lines or broken utility lines.
  • Do not enter damaged buildings until you are told that they are safe.
  • Save your phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messaging or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear thick-soled shoes, long pants, and work gloves.

Hurricanes

Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. Potential threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from approximately June 1 to November 30. Hurricanes:

  • Can happen along any U.S. coast or in any territory in the Atlantic or Pacific oceans.
  • Can affect areas more than 100 miles inland.
  • Are most active in September.

Building Coordinators and Assistant Coordinators will;

  1. be located at every Hurricane Safety location.
  2. be responsible for identifying safe locations for students, faculty, and staff to be located.
  3. attempt to block windows and doors if safe
  4. assist in accountability of students, staff, and faculty.
  5. announce the “all clear” when directed to by the Command Post Team (CPT)

If you are under a hurricane warning, find safe shelter right away.

For Huntingdon College designated areas to shelter in place during a Hurricane warning or other severe weather event see the locations listed under Tornadoes.

  • Determine how best to protect yourself from high winds and flooding.
    • Evacuate if told to do so by a Building Coordinator or member of Security. Huntingdon College’s Crisis Management Team and Campus Security will keep you informed of any mandatory evacuation of the campus through the Emergency Notification System.
  • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
  • Take refuge in a designated storm shelter, or an interior room for high winds.
  • Turn Around, Do not attempt to walk, swim, or drive through flood waters.

Prepare NOW

  • Know your area’s risk of hurricanes.
  • Sign up for the Hawk Alert Emergency Notification System. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • If you are at risk for flash flooding, watch for warning signs such as heavy rain.
  • Practice going to a safe shelter for high winds. The next best protection is a small, interior, windowless room in a sturdy building on the lowest level that is not subject to flooding.
  • Follow the list of Designated areas to shelter in place listed above, based on your current location. Become familiar with your evacuation zone, the evacuation route, and shelter locations.
  • Keep important documents in a safe place or create password-protected digital copies.
  • Protect your property especially electronics, and ensure you maintain back-ups of your digital media.

Survive DURING

  • If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
  • Do not drive around barricades.
  • If sheltering during high winds, go to the designated storm shelter for your location, or a small, interior, windowless room or hallway on the lowest floor that is not subject to flooding.
  • If trapped in a building by flooding, go to the highest level of the building. Do not climb into a closed attic. You may become trapped by rising flood water.
  • Listen for current emergency information and instructions.
  • Do not attempt to walk, swim, or drive through flood waters. Turn Around. Just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down, and one foot of moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
  • Stay off of bridges over fast-moving water.

Be Safe AFTER

  • Listen to authorities for information and special instructions.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear protective clothing and work with someone else.
  • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris and snakes. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Document any property damage with photographs.
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